Date of Award

Summer 8-1-2015

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Educational Leadership and School Counseling

Committee Chair

Dr. Thelma Roberson

Committee Chair Department

Educational Leadership and School Counseling

Committee Member 2

Dr. James Johnson

Committee Member 3

Dr. Leslie Locke

Committee Member 3 Department

Educational Leadership and School Counseling

Committee Member 4

Dr. Mike Ward

Committee Member 4 Department

Educational Leadership and School Counseling

Abstract

This study examined whether a relationship exists between one-to-one computing and student achievement, specifically ACT scores. This study also examined whether relationships exist among teachers’ perceptions of one-to-one computing, teachers’ years of experience, subjects taught by teachers, teachers’ skill level in the use of a computer for instruction, and teachers’ perceptions of changes in ACT scores. The results of this study could help policymakers and educators with decisions regarding implementation of one-to-one computing programs.

The sample of schools for investigating the relationship between one-to-one computing and ACT scores consisted of 33 secondary public schools with one-to-one computing programs located in school districts from multiple states in the United States. There were 122 teachers from 12 secondary public schools with one-to-one computing programs located in school districts from multiple states in the United States who participated in a survey regarding teachers’ perceptions of one-to-one computing.

Prior to the implementation of one-to-one computing and the corresponding tests in the same schools, the average student ACT composite scores and ACT subtest scores in English, math, and reading were not statistically different from what they are after two years of implementation. A statistically significant difference was found between the average student ACT subtest scores in science in schools one year prior to implementing one-to-one computing and the average student ACT subtest scores in science in the same schools two years after implementing one-to-one computing. A statistically significant difference was not found between the average change in student ACT composite score and ACT subtest scores in the state and the average change in student ACT composite score and ACT subtest scores in schools with two years of experience in implementing one-to-one computing. A statistically significant relationship was not found among teachers’ perceptions of one-to-one computing, subjects taught by teachers, teachers’ skill level in the use of a computer for instruction, and teachers’ perceptions of changes in ACT scores. A modest significant inverse relationship was found between teachers’ perceptions of one-to-one computing and teachers’ years of experience. As teachers’ years of experience increase, their perceptions of one-to-one computing tend to become less positive.

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