Date of Award

Spring 5-2017

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Polymers and High Performance Materials

Committee Chair

Dr. James Rawlins

Committee Chair Department

Polymers and High Performance Materials

Committee Member 2

Dr. Jeffery Wiggins

Committee Member 2 Department

Polymers and High Performance Materials

Committee Member 3

Dr. Derek Patton

Committee Member 3 Department

Polymers and High Performance Materials

Committee Member 4

Dr. Sarah Morgan

Committee Member 4 Department

Polymers and High Performance Materials

Committee Member 5

Dr. Gopinath Subramanian

Committee Member 5 Department

Polymers and High Performance Materials

Abstract

This dissertation research sought to provide a fundamental basis of understanding to commence the systematic investigation of developing economically viable fully formulated epoxy-amine coating systems containing multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT). Namely, a facile and rapid method for multiwall carbon nanotube surface modification and molecular structure interpretation was developed to assist in designing MWCNT-polymer interactions and achieving high levels of dispersion. Additionally, a rapid and quantitative method was developed to investigate the dispersibility potential of MWCNTs possessing a given surface modification in combination with a dispersion protocol which can further be utilized as a quality control metric in commercial applications. It was observed and quantified that multiwall carbon nanotubes altered the average water hydrogen bonding distribution within an epoxy-amine polymer thin film. These measured differences in water hydrogen bonding interactions correlated consistently and well with reduced corrosion rates of epoxy-amine coated steel substrates with intentionally created defects. To create further understanding, additional nano-carbon allotropes (carbon black, MWCNT, graphene) were utilized in an attempt to establish a relationship between water hydrogen bonding interactions within an epoxy-amine matrix coated over a steel substrate and the corrosion performance; specifically, when the relative concentration of bound water increased and the relative concentration of free water decreased, the overall rate of corrosion decreased in each of the systems studied. A simple and experimentally derived equation proved capable of predicting ~91% of the variation in the measured corrosion rates from the established water hydrogen bonding interactions measured at ambient from pre-corrosion testing conditions, t=0, using a stepwise multivariable regression analysis approach and incorporating each of the varying nano-carbon allotrope systems.

ORCID ID

orcid.org/0000-0002-4300-7937

Available for download on Sunday, May 12, 2019

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