Date of Award

12-2014

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Human Performance and Recreation

Committee Chair

Melissa Thompson

Committee Chair Department

Human Performance and Recreation

Committee Member 2

Nancy Speed

Committee Member 2 Department

Human Performance and Recreation

Committee Member 3

Trenton Gould

Committee Member 3 Department

Human Performance and Recreation

Committee Member 4

Gary Krebs

Committee Member 4 Department

Human Performance and Recreation

Committee Member 5

Scot Piland

Committee Member 5 Department

Human Performance and Recreation

Abstract

The obesity epidemic has caused tremendous burden to our economy and healthcare system. Physical activity is one method that can reduce the obesity rate. However, physical activity declines in high school and does not recover. The likelihood of adolescents continuing their involvement in physical activity depends on how they navigate the highs and lows of their physical activity experiences (Feltz & Magyar, 2006). The purpose of this study is to look at the role of observational learning in physical activity and behaviors in an adolescent population. Specifically, this research examines the influence of observational learning on self-reported physical activity, self-efficacy for physical activity, and health-related fitness knowledge, controlling for gender, ethnicity, and grade.

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