Date of Award

Summer 8-2014

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Psychology

Committee Chair

Dr. John Harsh

Committee Chair Department

Psychology

Committee Member 2

Dr. Stanley Kuczaj

Committee Member 2 Department

Psychology

Committee Member 3

Dr. Sheree Watson

Committee Member 3 Department

Psychology

Committee Member 4

Dr. Tammy Greer

Committee Member 4 Department

Psychology

Committee Member 5

Dr. Alen Hajnal

Committee Member 5 Department

Psychology

Abstract

This study examined the effect of nap restriction on 3- to 5-year-old habitually napping children’s emotional responding. It was predicted that the intensity of emotional stimuli would moderate the relationship between nap restriction and the magnitude of emotional responding. Specifically, following nap restriction, the emotional responses to stronger stimuli would be amplified, while the emotional responses to weaker stimuli would be reduced. Emotional stimuli, were classified into four categories: strong negative, weak negative, weak positive, and strong positive. Facial electromyography was measured to reflect preschoolers’ emotional responses. The results indicated emotional responses to both strong negative and positive stimuli were amplified following nap deprivation. Planned analyses revealed no differences in emotional responses to weak stimuli with exploratory analyses suggesting actual amplification with nap deprivation. This study examined the effect of nap restriction on 3- to 5-year-old habitually napping children’s emotional responding. It was predicted that the intensity of emotional stimuli would moderate the relationship between nap restriction and the magnitude of emotional responding. Specifically, following nap restriction, the emotional responses to stronger stimuli would be amplified, while the emotional responses to weaker stimuli would be reduced. Emotional stimuli, were classified into four categories: strong negative, weak negative, weak positive, and strong positive. Facial electromyography was measured to reflect preschoolers’ emotional responses. The results indicated emotional responses to both strong negative and positive stimuli were amplified following nap deprivation. Planned analyses revealed no differences in emotional responses to weak stimuli with exploratory analyses suggesting actual amplification with nap deprivation.

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