Date of Award

Spring 5-2016

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Educational Studies and Research

Committee Chair

Dr. Lilian H. Hill

Committee Chair Department

Educational Studies and Research

Committee Member 2

Dr. Thomas Lipscomb

Committee Member 2 Department

Educational Studies and Research

Committee Member 3

Dr. Georgianna Martin

Committee Member 3 Department

Educational Studies and Research

Committee Member 4

Dr. Richard Mohn

Committee Member 4 Department

Educational Studies and Research

Abstract

The field of academic advising has evolved to incorporate more developmental approaches to academic advising, which includes analyzing a college student's personal or academic experience, as well as future career aspirations. An avenue of understanding a student’s background would be to understand the parental type to which students have been exposed. This study attempts to determine if there are relationships between academic advising type, parental type and transition of the freshmen college student. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships of the academic advising types, including developmental and prescriptive advising, and parental types, whether permissive, authoritative, and authoritarian, on the transition that college freshmen students encounter during the freshmen year of college. The study further determined if college transition differed based on the type of academic advising and the type of parenting a student receives. An additional aim of this research was to determine if there are relationships on academic advisement and parental types on college transition was related to race or gender. The researcher received permission to use the Academic Advising Inventory, Part I and the Parental Authority Questionnaire. The researcher also purchased the Student Adaptation to College Questionnaire. These instruments were used to collect data from sophomore students attending four-year public

colleges/universities in the southeastern region of the United States. A total of 193 sophomore students participated in this study.

The majority of the student participants in the study reported they were white (Caucasian), female, traditional age sophomore students (between the ages of 18-20). The majority of students also indicated receiving developmental academic advising and authoritative parental type.

Survey findings failed to provide evidence for a relationship between academic advising types, race, or gender on freshmen college student transition. The relationship was, however, significantly related to parental type. Research findings showed that academic adjustment increased with parents who were authoritative and social adjustment increased with parents who were permissive.

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