Date of Award

Spring 5-8-2015

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Educational Leadership and School Counseling

Committee Chair

David E. Lee

Committee Chair Department

Educational Leadership and School Counseling

Committee Member 2

James T. Johnson

Committee Member 2 Department

Educational Studies and Research

Committee Member 3

Stanley C. Benigno

Committee Member 3 Department

Educational Leadership and School Counseling

Committee Member 4

Michael Ward

Committee Member 4 Department

Educational Leadership and School Counseling

Abstract

This study sought to determine whether a link existed between types of persuasive communication methods and the academic performance of school districts and whether administrators’ perceived self-efficacy as communicators was related to the academic performance of school districts. This study could help school officials to analyze their use of persuasive communication methods to determine if they are communicating with the public in a manner that is conducive to achieving the goals related to the academic performance of their district. School officials could also use the results of this study to design or modify an existing public relations plan to communicate in a manner that impacts district performance.

The population of this study consisted of Mississippi school administrators responsible for school communication with the public on a district level. Potential participants received this instrument as a paper and pencil document sent through the mail. There was no statistically significant correlation found between types of persuasive communication used and the academic performance of school districts, but a regression model found that a small amount of variation in academic performance was explained by the types of persuasive communication used. There was no statistically significant correlation found between the frequency of using persuasive communication and the academic performance of school districts, but a regression model revealed that a meaningful amount of variance in academic performance could be explained by the frequency of using persuasive communication. There was also no statistically significant link between school leaders’ self-efficacy as communicators and the academic performance of school districts.

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