Document Type

Article

Publication Date

1987

Department

Biological Sciences

Abstract

Species of the Neotropical orchid genus Stanhopea produce a fragrance comprising terpenoids and aromatics which attracts euglossine bee pollinators. The secretory tissue, called an osmo- phore, is located in the adaxial region of a sac formed near the proximal portion of the floral lip. This region is easily recognized in Stanhopea oculata and S. wardii because it is papillate. The osmophore in these two species includes all the cells of the papillae and those directly below, that grade into fundamental tissue. Osmophore cells are more densely cytoplasmic than cells in the adjacent tissue. Numerous amyloplasts and mitochondria are seen in these cells from the earliest bud stages we examined through anthesis. Smooth and rough endoplasmic reticulum are abundant, but dictyosomes are uncommon. Mitochondria of osmophore cells appear to be distributed with no apparent pattern during bud stages, although they tend to be aligned near the plasmalemma at anthesis. Osmophore cells are highly vacuolate after anthesis.

Comments

Originally published in: American Journal of Botany (1987) Volume: 74, Issue: 9, Pages: 1323-1331

For more information, visit Dr. Curry's SelectedWorks page.

Publication Title

American Journal of Botany

Volume

74

Issue

9

First Page

1323

Last Page

1331

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