Title

Contingent Self-Esteem and Race: Implications For the Black Self-Esteem Advantage

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

2-1-2007

Department

Psychology

Abstract

Previous research has found that despite being aware of negative stereotypes about their group and experiencing prejudice and discrimination, Blacks tend to report higher levels of self-esteem than Whites. Despite the robust nature of the Black self-esteem advantage, an adequate explanation for the higher self-esteem of Blacks relative to Whites has yet to be offered. The present studies examine whether Blacks and Whites differ in the domains on which their self-esteem is based and whether these differences mediate the relationship between race and self-esteem. The present studies found that Blacks and Whites tend to base their self-esteem on different domains and that the tendency of Whites to base their self-esteem on the approval of others provides a partial explanation for the Black self-esteem advantage. These findings are discussed in terms of their relevance to racial differences in self-esteem.

Publication Title

Journal of Black Psychology

Volume

33

Issue

1

First Page

51

Last Page

74