Title

Averting behavior and urban air pollution

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

8-1-1997

Department

Community Health Sciences

Abstract

Unique panel data are used to explain defensive responses to air pollution using determinants predicted by an averting behavior model. Empirical results indicate that persons who experience smog-related symptoms spend significantly less time outdoors as ozone concentrations exceed the national standard. Many people also report making other behavioral changes to avoid smoggy conditions and the propensity to do so appears to increase with schooling or if health symptoms ape experienced. Results provide evidence that people adjust daily activities to defend against acute health effects of air pollution, though mitigation appears less closely linked to chronic health impairments.

Publication Title

LAND ECONOMICS

Volume

73

Issue

3

First Page

340

Last Page

357