Date of Award

Spring 5-13-2016

Degree Type

Masters Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

Psychology

Committee Chair

Emily Bullock Yowell

Committee Chair Department

Psychology

Committee Member 2

Melanie Leuty

Committee Member 2 Department

Psychology

Committee Member 3

Bonnie Nicholson

Committee Member 3 Department

Psychology

Abstract

Using Holland’s theory, the author examined moderators that may influence students’ academic success and satisfaction while accounting for cognitive influence. Data from 233 undergraduate students was analyzed using a series of hierarchical multiple regressions. The study sought to determine if student employment and the level of interest profile elevation were significant moderators of the relationship between congruence with college major and academic major satisfaction, as well as academic major success. Uniquely, academic major success was determined through GPA and a 10-subscale self-report measure. Cognitive influences were operationalized as positive and negative thinking and accounted for in all analyses. Correlation results suggested that student employment has a negative relationship with academic success as measured by GPA. No study hypotheses were supported but regression analyses did reveal significant impact of cognitive influences on both academic major satisfaction and academic major success in both research questions. Based on these findings, clinicians are encouraged to aid students in strategically planning the relationship between required work and educational responsibilities.

ORCID ID

0000-0003-3005-6702

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