Understanding the relationship between students' reading achievement and teachers' self-regulation patterns in grades K--3

Pamela Renee Allen

Abstract

Previous findings on student self-regulation support the fact that students who are self-regulated achieve more in their academics, including students taught self-regulation interventions. However, there has been little research to establish how a teacher's self-regulation affects a student's academic success. Therefore, the purpose of this quantitative research study was to determine what specific teacher factors contribute to a teacher's self-regulation score and a student's reading achievement. The study consisted of 276 teachers in Grades K-3 in a large Alabama school district. Reading achievement test scores and the Self-Regulation Inventory (Casler, 2005a) were collected from respondents. A Pearson product-moment correlation established that there was no significant relationship between a teacher's self-regulation score and a student's reading achievement ( r = -.061, p = .321). Independent variable correlations were analyzed using a simultaneous multiple regression analysis. Independent variables were National Board certification, years of experience, highest degree earned, and current grade level. No significant correlations between the independent variables (specific teacher characteristics) and teacher's self-regulation patterns were established. According to this study, understanding the relationship between students' reading achievement and teachers' self-regulation scores in Grades K-3 are not correlated and revealed no statistical significance. The findings suggest that K-3 teachers who self-report are more self-regulated in their instructional practices.