Title

The Investigation of Five Modes of Data Entry and the Content Validation of a Multimedia Data Entry Test

Date of Award

1999

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Psychology

First Advisor

Howard Anderson

Advisor Department

Psychology

Abstract

The differences between data entry skills were examined using a multimedia based data entry test developed for customer service representatives and financial services associates. Eighty-one incumbents employed by a large nationally based telecommunications company participated in the study. Mousing skills measured were single clicking and double clicking, and keyboarding skills measured were visual on-screen stimulus to screen input, visual hardcopy stimulus to screen input and auditory stimulus to screen input. Mouse scores were computed as the total time required to click nine numbered boxes. Keyboarding tests were scored in correct characters per minute. Five scoring algorithms for keyboarding tests were developed and tested. Correct characters per minute keyboarding scores differed by type of test and type of item, but all three tests ranked participants similarly. Mousing scores did not predict keyboarding scores, lending to support the notion that mousing and keyboarding are distinct skills. The tests showed high internal consistency. Limited adverse impact against legally protected subgroups was noted.