Title

The Effect of Employment On Students' Achievements

Date of Award

2004

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Educational Leadership and School Counseling

First Advisor

Ronald Styron, Jr.

Advisor Department

Educational Leadership and School Counseling

Abstract

The effect of employment on students' achievements was investigated. The data was collected from a sample of 41 junior students who were employed and 44 junior students who were not employed while attending high school and was analyzed descriptively and inferentially using an ANCOVA for hypotheses 1 and 2 and multiple linear regression for hypotheses 3 and 4. Responses from the survey measured the following dimensions: Students' Grade Point Averages (GPAs) for the nine-weeks and semester from the permanent school records of both groups, and the students' study habits, participation in extracurricular activities, plans for postsecondary education, number of hours worked per week, gender, age, and socioeconomic levels. The findings indicated that there was not a significant difference between GPAs nine-weeks and GPAs semester and employment status, while controlling for gender, race, and socioeconomic level. However, hours worked, gender, race, and socioeconomic level had a significant effect on GPAs nine-weeks; but hours worked, gender, race, and socioeconomic level did not show a significant effect on GPAs semester. Specifically, there was a significant relationship between GPA nine-weeks and the individual variable, gender. Furthermore, there was not a significant relationship among study habits, and number of hours worked, gender, race, and socioeconomic level.