Title

Faculty Perceptions Regarding the Importance of Service Activities During Tenure, Promotion, and Merit Pay Evaluations

Date of Award

2001

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Human Performance and Recreation

First Advisor

Jerry Phillips

Advisor Department

Human Performance and Recreation

Abstract

This study comprehensively examined literature on tenure, promotion, and merit pay evaluations, specifically looking for literature that addressed service. The instrument utilized in the study was the Survey of Higher Education Faculty (SHEF) questionnaire, which was sent to all faculty members in Physical Education, Sport Studies, Recreation and Exercise Science disciplines from Carnegie Classification Research I Intensive and Extensive Universities from the 13 SDAAPHERD states. Faculty member's personal perception of the importance of each service activity directed the study. The researcher utilized three categories to determine if differences occurred between group means. Years of teaching experience in higher education, professorial rank, and tenure status were the categories utilized to delineate between faculty members. Research questions were accepted or rejected based upon tests using ANOVA, Independent samples t-Tests and a Pearson product moment correlation at an α ≤ .05 rejection level. A one-way analysis of variance was used to determine differences in faculty perception of service activity importance during tenure, promotion, and merit pay increases between the five groups based on years of teaching experience. Each service activity was tested, which includes the following: supervision of graduate study, student advising, campus committee work, faculty involvement in professional societies, advising professional student organizations, public service, and supervision of honors programs. Results for the independent variable years of teaching experience found statistically significant differences for three service activities. Those service activities included campus committee work resulting in an F (4, 182) = 2.43, p < .05, advising professional student organization resulting in an F (4, 181) = 3.69, p < .05, and public service resulting in an F (4, 181) = 4.52, p < .05. A one-way analysis of variance was used to determine differences in faculty perception of service activity importance during tenure, promotion, and merit pay increases between the three professor rank groups. The independent variable professor rank resulted in one service activity having a statistically significant difference. Supervision of graduate study resulted in an F (2, 167) = 3.18, p < .05. An independent samples T-test was used to determine differences in faculty perception of service activity importance during tenure, promotion, and merit pay increases between the two tenure status groups. There was a statistically significant difference between the group means for advising professional student organizations; t (183) = 2.60, p = .010. Pearson product-moment correlation test was used to measure the strength of the relationship between faculty perception of service activities importance during tenure, promotion, and merit pay evaluations and the faculty member's perception of the importance institutions apply to service activities during tenure, promotion, and merit pay evaluations. Positive relationships exist between every service activity variable when Pearson correlation test was implemented.