Title

Teacher Self-Efficacy and Site-Based Management As a Decentralization Strategy

Date of Award

2002

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Educational Leadership and School Counseling

First Advisor

Jack Klotz

Advisor Department

Educational Leadership and School Counseling

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine and evaluate the initiatives of teacher self-efficacy and site-based management as effective tools for the school reform movement and its mission to improve student learning and achievement. Four groups of teachers completed a survey to determine the impact of teacher self-efficacy and site-based management at site-based managed schools and non-site-based managed schools. Two groups of teachers were employed at secondary site-based managed schools and the other two groups of teachers were employed at secondary non-site-based managed schools. The major objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between teacher self-efficacy and site-based management in site-based managed schools and non-site-based managed schools. First, the study examined whether there was a difference in teacher self-efficacy among teachers in site-based managed schools and teachers in non-site-based managed schools. The analysis of the data showed that teachers in site-based managed schools had a higher level of teacher self-efficacy than teachers in non-site-based managed schools. A second purpose of this study was to examine whether there was a difference among teachers in site-based managed schools and teachers in non-site-based managed schools relative to influence on curriculum, school resources, instruction, and disciplinary practices. Analysis of the data showed that there was a significant difference in teacher self-efficacy among teachers in site-based managed schools and teachers in non-site-based managed schools relative to influence on the variables of curriculum, school resources, and disciplinary procedures. There was not a significant difference in teacher self-efficacy among the teachers relative to influence on the variable of instruction. Additionally analysis of the data also showed that gender, degree, and years of experience do not make a difference relative to teacher self-efficacy among teachers in site-based schools and non-site-based schools. Overall, findings from this study indicated that teacher self-efficacy in site-based managed schools was better in relation to five of the six hypotheses presented. The findings also indicated that gender, degree and years of experience do not make a difference relative to teacher self-efficacy among teachers in site-based schools and non-site-based schools. In spite of all of the other variables involved in the study, it is the administration of the site-based management process that makes a difference between teachers in site-based managed schools and non-site-based schools.