Title

Self-Reported Perceptions of Literacy Skills In Nursing Programs At Selected Southern Institutions

Date of Award

2003

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Educational Leadership and School Counseling

First Advisor

Thelma J. Roberson

Advisor Department

Educational Leadership and School Counseling

Abstract

Nursing students are increasingly demanded to be flexible, innovative, and information literate in order to solve complex healthcare problems. This research assessed the self-reported perceptions of faculty and students in nursing baccalaureate programs at selected colleges and universities in the South and determined faculty and students' levels of confidence in their abilities to conduct library research. Specific focus was to examine faculty perceptions of their students' information literacy skills (ILS), students' perceptions of the faculty, and the faculty's ILS, and the faculty students' self-reported perception of their own skills (ILS) competency. To address this problem, 105 Faculty Perception Survey of Information Literacy Skills surveys and 176 Students' Perception Survey of Information Literacy Skills surveys were used to collect data on the faculty and students' ILS at four selected colleges and universities in the South. Principal dissertation findings include: (a) nursing students' perceptions of the nursing faculty's ILS were higher than the students' perception of their own ILS; (b) nursing faculty's ILS perception of themselves was higher than the nursing students' ILS perception of the faculty; and (c) nursing students' ILS perception of themselves was higher than the nursing faculty's ILS perception of the nursing students.