Title

Superintendent Competencies For Continued Employment As Perceived By Louisiana Public School Superintendents and Board Presidents

Date of Award

1999

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Educational Leadership and School Counseling

First Advisor

Jack Klotz

Advisor Department

Educational Leadership and School Counseling

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine if there were differences between perceptions of school superintendents and school board presidents in Louisiana public school districts on the criterion variable of superintendent competencies needed for continued employment in the superintendency. This study purposed to determine if the differences were related to the variables of age, gender, years of experience, and size of district. In addition, a purpose of the study was to identify those competencies which when performed unsatisfactorily would most likely cause the dismissal of the superintendent as perceived by the school board presidents and the superintendents in Louisiana. The target population for this study included all superintendents and school board presidents of public school districts in the state of Louisiana. Eighty percent of the superintendents and seventy-five percent of the board presidents responded to the instrument, "Survey Questionnaire: Superintendents" or "Survey Questionnaire: School Board Presidents." Superintendent competencies ranked were (a) public relations, (b) school finance, (c) personnel management, (d) curriculum development, (e) policy formulation, (f) school construction, (g) accomplish goals set by board, (h) superintendent/board relations, and (i) collective negotiations. The study revealed that there were no significant differences in the perceptions of superintendents and school board presidents in regard to the importance of competencies needed for continued employment by the superintendent. School superintendents and board presidents ranked (a) public relations, (b) school finance, (c) personnel management, (d) curriculum development, (e) policy formulation, (f) accomplish goals set by board, and (g) collective negotiations as the most important competencies. Concerning the competencies which when performed inadequately would cause the dismissal of the superintendent, the study revealed significant differences between school board presidents and superintendents. School board presidents perceived the competency of curriculum development as the most likely reason for dismissal when performed inadequately. The superintendents perceived the competency of superintendent/board relations as the most likely reason for dismissal when performed inadequately.