Title

The effect of information type on attitudes toward the implementation of personnel selection practices

Date of Award

2003

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Psychology

First Advisor

Jeffrey Kudisch

Advisor Department

Psychology

Abstract

The goal of I/O psychology is to expand our understanding of individual work behaviors and organizational behavior and to apply this knowledge to improve organizational performance. Despite the potential of I/O psychology, its overall impact has been hindered by the gap between the science and practice of the field. The current study attempts to demonstrate that managers rely on information that is more pragmatic and less technical or academic when making decisions regarding a proposed selection procedure. Specifically, it was proposed that managers will rely more on adverse impact, social validity and best practice information than validity or utility information. Results indicated that participants who received validity plus utility information or validity plus applicant reactions information were more willing to implement the proposed selection procedure. Adverse impact, social validity and best practice information did not increase participants' willingness to implement the proposed selection procedure. Including utility information with validity did increase participants' acceptance of the information, but including adverse impact, social validity and best practice information did not increase acceptance of the information. Participants' trust in the information was not influenced by including additional types of information with validity. Supplementary analyses indicate that participants' understanding of the information is important in order for the information to influence implementation decisions. Theoretical and practical implications and limitations to the current study are discussed.