Title

The Relationship Between Reading Recovery Story-Writing Activity and Student Achievement and Acceleration Rate

Date of Award

1996

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Education (EdD)

Department

Educational Studies and Research

First Advisor

Arthur Southerland

Advisor Department

Educational Studies and Research

Abstract

The primary purpose of this study was to determine if the amount of learning activity during the writing portion of Reading Recovery lessons was related to the reading achievement and acceleration rates of Reading Recovery children. The ultimate goal was to provide data for educators to use in the implementation of Reading Recovery. The subjects were 100 first-grade Reading Recovery students from school year 1995-96 who discontinued or had at least 60 Reading Recovery lessons. These subjects would have been identified, following standard Reading Recovery selection procedures, as the poorest first-grade readers in their schools as determined by the Observation Survey and other criteria. The subjects were Chapter 1 students representing three school districts, 16 schools, 35 Reading Recovery teachers, 42 classroom teachers, and five Reading Recovery teacher leaders. Multiple regression, the semipartial technique, was used to test the two hypotheses of the study with an alpha level of.05 set for all tests. The study yielded two major findings: (1) There was a significant relationship between entries per lesson on the writing practice pages of Reading Recovery children's writing books at levels 4, 6, 8, and 10 and Reading Recovery children's end-of-the-year text reading levels while controlling for days in first grade and entry text reading level. The use of entries per lesson to predict end-of-the-year text reading level appeared to have little practical value since this variable may explain only 5% of the original variability. (2) There was a significant relationship between entries per lesson on the writing practice pages of Reading Recovery children's writing books at levels 4, 6, 8, and 10 and Reading Recovery children's rate of acceleration while controlling for days in first grade and entry text reading level. The use of entries per lesson to predict acceleration rate appeared to have little practical value since this variable may explain only about 5% of the original variability. Correlations between the variables of the study revealed other pertinent relationships which supported the major findings of the study, Reading Recovery principles, and previous research reported in the literature.