Title

Leadership Behaviors of Academic College Deans in Mississippi's Eight State-Supported Universities

Date of Award

2004

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Educational Studies and Research

First Advisor

Clyde Ginn

Advisor Department

Educational Studies and Research

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine whether the four dimensions of leadership that include (1) Dominance (how an individual responds to problems and challenges), (2) Influence (how an individual influences others to their point of view), (3) Steadiness (how an individual responds to the pace of their environment), and (4) Compliance (how an individual responds to rules and procedures set by others) were perceived differently by academic college deans in Mississippi. Another objective of this research was to determine the relationship between the deans' leadership style and the variables of age, gender, years served as an academic administrator, and number of faculty supervised. The results of this study were developed by conducting a review of related literature, using the findings of previous studies, and surveying academic college deans on the four areas of leadership behaviors. The sample for this study was the 35 academic college deans in Mississippi's eight state-supported universities. It appears from the results of this study that, while not significant, certain independent relationships do exist between the set of criterion variables (dominance, influence, steadiness, and compliance) and the independent variables (years served as an academic administrator and number of faculty supervised). The perceptions of their leadership behaviors tended to increase with years served as an academic administrator for dominance (how an individual responds to problems and challenges) on the responses least like them , steadiness (how an individual responds to the pace of their environment) on the responses least like them , and steadiness (how an individual responds to problems and challenges) on the responses most like them . It also appears from this research that an independent relationship does exist between the criterion variable of natural style (a person's basic behavior) and number of faculty supervised.