Title

Biopsy-Determined Muscle Fiber Distribution In Collegiate Track and Field Athletes and Common Tests of Anaerobic Performance

Date of Award

1990

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Human Performance and Recreation

First Advisor

Walter R. Thompson

Advisor Department

Human Performance and Recreation

Abstract

Percutaneous needle biopsies were performed on the m. vastus lateralis of 14 male NCAA Division I track and field athletes to estimate their muscle fiber distribution, specifically, the percentage of Type IIb muscle fiber. The group of 14 athletes were of a heterogeneous training background, including six athletes who were primarily aerobically trained and eight who were primarily anaerobically trained. Tests commonly used to measure anaerobic performance were also administered to the subjects. Field tests included the Sargent vertical jump, the standing long jump, and the 50-yard dash. Laboratory tests included isokinetic peak torque relative to bodyweight for knee extension at 60, 180, and 300 degrees/s, isokinetic torque acceleration energy relative to bodyweight for knee extension at 300 degrees/s, and the Wingate Anaerobic Test for peak power relative to bodyweight. Statistical treatment was performed by the calculations of Pearson product-moment coefficients between the percentage of Type IIb muscle fibers and performance on each of the tests of anaerobic performance. The Pearson product-moment coefficients showed a statistically significant relationship between only one of these tests of anaerobic performance and the percentage of Type IIb muscle fiber: the 50-yard dash (p $<$.05). Conclusions are that the needle biopsy determined percentage of Type IIb muscle fibers in the m. vastus lateralis is significantly related to performance in the 50-yard dash but not to performance in the Sargent vertical jump, standing long jump, isokinetic peak torque relative to bodyweight for knee extension at 60, 180, and 300 degrees/s, isokinetic torque acceleration energy relative to bodyweight for knee extension at 300 degrees/s, and the Wingate Anaerobic Test for peak power relative to bodyweight (p $>$.05).