Title

A Study Comparing the Influence of Inquiry and Traditional Science Instruction Methods On Science Achievement, Attitudes Toward Science, and Integrated Process Skills In Ninth Grade Students and the Relationship Between Sex, Race, Past Performance in Science, Intelligence and Acheivement

Date of Award

1985

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Educational Studies and Research

First Advisor

Fred W. Brown

Advisor Department

Educational Studies and Research

Abstract

This study analyzed the effects of two methods of science instruction, inquiry and traditional, on science process skills, attitudes toward science and achievement in science and determined the correlation of process skills, attitudes toward science and achievement in science with sex, race, past performance in science, intelligence and achievement. The subjects, sixty-seven in the inquiry group and fifty-nine in the traditional group, were ninth grade physical science students enrolled in a South Mississippi Municipal Separate School District. To obtain data for fulfilling purposes of this study, the following tests were administered following the teaching period: Test of Integrated Process Skills, Test of Science-Related Attitudes, and SRA Achievement Series, Multilevel Edition, Level H. Scores on the California Achievement Test, Short Form Test of Academic Aptitude, past performances in science and information pertaining to sex and race were collected from the student record card. Multiple linear regression using the covariates technique and multiple correlations were used to test the hypothesis at the .05 level of statistical significance. Based upon the findings of this study, the following conclusions were drawn: (a) Subjects in the two groups did not differ significantly on science integrated process skills and attitude toward science, (b) subjects in the inquiry group did differ significantly from those in the traditional group in science achievement, (c) the relationship between process skills and the variables of sex, race, past performance in science, intelligence and achievement was not significant in the inquiry course, and (d) a significant relationship was found to exist between the variables of sex, race, past performance in science, intelligence and achievement and attitude toward science.