Title

Social Desirability Responding In Children: The Effects of Three Test Administration Procedures On Socially Desirable Responding and a Self-Report Personality Inventory

Date of Award

1994

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Psychology

First Advisor

John Alcorn

Advisor Department

Psychology

Abstract

This study investigated the effects of three methods of self-report inventory administration on the social desirability response set and self-esteem scores in children. Fifty-one 10, 11, and 12-year-old children completed a self-esteem inventory and a social desirability questionnaire under three conditions: (a) oral administration with oral responding, (b) oral administration with written responding, and (c) self administration with written responding. A MANOVA yielded no group differentiation with regard to the dependent variables of social desirability score, a Lie score, and self-esteem score. There were significant correlations between socially desirable responding and self-esteem scores in all participants, as well as participants when pooled within groups. Results are discussed with regard to trends in scores related to perceived anonymity of the test-taker under differing conditions and future development of inventories suspicion-free of the social desirability response set.