Title

Perceived Levels of Stress Among Teachers and Principals of Selected Elementary and Junior High Schools In Taiwan

Author

Wu-zen Lee

Date of Award

1994

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Educational Studies and Research

First Advisor

Arthur R. Southerland

Advisor Department

Educational Studies and Research

Abstract

This study determined the relationships between the perceived levels of stress among teachers and principals of selected elementary and junior high schools in Taiwan and how those relationships differed according to selected demographic, educational, and environmental characteristics. Participants included 496 teachers and 133 principals of public elementary and junior high schools. The Chinese translations of the Teacher Stress Inventory (TSI) and the Administrative Stress Index (ASI) were utilized for the study and administered in May, 1994. This study found that the average level of stress among the teachers was significantly higher than the average level among the principals. Time Management, Work-Related Stressors, and Discipline and Motivation were the biggest stressors for teachers. Task-Based Stress was the biggest stress source for the principals. A significant relationship was found between Task-Based Stress and the composite set of variables of the principals. Significant independent relationships also existed between Total/Task-Based Stress and environmental characteristics. For the teachers, significant relationships were found between Total Stress and the composite set of variables. Further analyses revealed significant independent relationships between some stress factors and each of the demographic, educational, and environmental characteristics. A significant relationship was found between levels of teacher and administrative stress. However, no significant differences were found among home-room teachers of different grade levels and subject teachers. It was recommended that this study be replicated in other regions with subjects in both public and private schools, involve more personal factors, employ random sampling, and utilize both quantitative and qualitative methods. Specific areas pertaining to administrative and teacher stress were also recommended for further study.