Title

The Effects of the Family Math Parental Involvement Program On Students' Cognitive and Affective Behaviors and Parents' Attitudes Toward Education

Date of Award

1993

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Curriculum, Instruction, and Special Education

First Advisor

Emma Nan Owens

Advisor Department

Curriculum, Instruction, and Special Education

Abstract

The study was designed to assess the effects of the Family Math parental involvement program on mathematics achievement, anxiety towards mathematics, attitudes toward mathematics, self-esteem, children's perceptions of parental involvement, and parental attitudes toward education. The subjects of the study included fourth and fifth grade students (Experimental: n = 49; Control: n = 43) and their parents (n = 80) who volunteered to attend at least four of six evening workshops designed to instruct parents of ways to help their children in mathematics education. The study was conducted over a six week period during the spring of 1993; data were collected the week following the last workshop. Multivariate analysis of variance procedures were used to test the effects of the Family Math program on students' mathematics achievement, attitudes toward mathematics, anxiety towards mathematics, and self-esteem. A priori directional t-tests were employed to test the effects of the Family Math program on children's perceptions of parental involvement and parental attitudes toward education. The major findings of the study revealed that participation in the Family Math program resulted in: (a) improved attitudes toward mathematics; (b) reduced anxiety towards mathematics; (c) increased amounts of time parents spent helping their children with educational activities; and (d) improved student enjoyment of the time spent working with parents. Additionally, findings of the study revealed that most students perceived their parents to enjoy and be willing to help them with mathematics-related activities. The results of the study suggest that fourth and fifth grade students of similar backgrounds would benefit from participation in the Family Math Program. In addition, the literature indicates that these results can be generalized to include other curriculum areas and students from other socioeconomic backgrounds. Previous research on parental involvement and the findings to this study jointly indicate that workshop programs are effective means to improve parental involvement in education and, ultimately, positively influence students' success in school.