Title

An Analysis of Job Satisfaction Variables Among State Institutional Special Education Teachers

Date of Award

1990

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Curriculum, Instruction, and Special Education

First Advisor

William V. Plue

Advisor Department

Curriculum, Instruction, and Special Education

Abstract

This study was designed to determine whether the individual and collective contributions, of the following variables were significant in predicting the job satisfaction of state institutional special education teachers. Variables to be studied include: (a) salary, (b) number of years teaching experience in special education, (c) fringe benefits, (d) teacher-principal/supervisor relations, (e) school facilities and supportive services, (f) multiple responsibilities/role conflicts, (g) student behavior/discipline problems, (h) lack of positive feedback/reward systems, (i) student achievement, and (j) time out from classroom. In addition, ten descriptors such as: (a) age, (b) sex, (c) race, (d) marital status, (e) educational level, (f) spouse/relative working in the same institution, (g) having retarded family members, (h) employee's handicapping condition, (i) birthplace, and (j) distance from work place were also investigated. The subjects of the present study consisted of 94 out of 98 institutional special education teachers (96% return). Data for this study were collected from responses to the Minnesota Satisfaction Questionnaire and the Special Education Teacher Survey. Analysis of the data was done using the multiple linear regression technique. Major findings of the study were: (1) The collective contribution of the 10 predictor variables was statistically significant in predicting the job satisfaction of institutional special education teachers. They collectively explained 62% of the variance. (2) The individual contributions of teacher-principal/supervisor relations and school facilities and supportive services were statistically significant in predicting the job satisfaction of institutional special education teachers.