Title

Assessment of a Test Anxiety Model With Traditional and Nontraditional Baccalaureate Student Nurses

Date of Award

1992

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Education (EdD)

Department

Educational Studies and Research

First Advisor

John R. Rachal

Advisor Department

Educational Studies and Research

Abstract

The purpose of this study was twofold; (1) to assess Meichenbaum and Butler's test anxiety model (1980), comprised of four components (cognitive structure, internal dialogue, behavioral acts, and behavioral outcomes) to determine the degree to which the components provided increments in the prediction of test anxiety, and (2) to determine the extent of difference between nontraditional and traditional baccalaureate student nurses on test anxiety and the model components. Independent variables were academic self-concept, cognitive interferences, study and test-taking skills and grade point average. The criterion variable, test anxiety, was measured using a test anxiety inventory. Subjects, consisting of 63 traditional and 47 nontraditional students, were assessed following a scheduled class and immediately following a course exam. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed a significant relationship between test anxiety and the composite set of model components, supporting Meichenbaum and Butler's model. Academic self-concept, cognitive interferences and study skills contributed significantly to the prediction of test anxiety. The behavioral outcomes component, measured by grade point average, was not significant to the prediction of test anxiety. No significant difference was found between traditional and nontraditional students on test anxiety. There was a significant difference between the two groups on knowledge of effective test-taking behaviors with nontraditional students scoring significantly higher on this attribute. The correlation scores of all variables for the two groups were compared using Fisher's Z-transformation. A significant difference was found between the two groups on the correlations of academic self-concept and knowledge of problems associated with developing effective study habits and in the correlations of academic self-concept and worry. Recommendations for further research are presented.