Title

The Relationship of Self-Concept, Socioeconomic Status, Race, and Sex to Mathematical Achievement of Five-Year-Old Students Attending an Academically Oriented Early Childhood Program and Those Attending a Socially Oriented Early Childhood Program

Date of Award

1986

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Curriculum, Instruction, and Special Education

First Advisor

Bobby D. Moore

Advisor Department

Curriculum, Instruction, and Special Education

Abstract

The main purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship of mathematical achievement of 5-year-old students attending an academically oriented early childhood program and those attending a socially oriented childhood program. The data were also analyzed for the following: a significant relationship between the criterion variable of mathematics achievement and the composite set of predictor variables of self-concept, socioeconomic status, race, and sex, and a significant independent relationship between the criterion variable of mathematics achievement and each of the predictor variables of self-concept, socioeconomic status, race, and sex. There were 120 5-year-old students who were given the Tests of Basic Experiences: Mathematics, Level K, and the Thomas Self-concept Values Test. Data showed no significant difference between academically and socially oriented programs. Data also showed the following: (a) a significant relationship between mathematical achievement and the composite set of variables; (b) a significant relationship between mathematical achievement and self-concept; and (c) no significant relationship between socioeconomic status, race, and sex.