Title

Job Satisfaction Among High School Principals In Mississippi

Date of Award

2007

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Educational Leadership and School Counseling

First Advisor

David E. Lee

Advisor Department

Educational Leadership and School Counseling

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to assess job satisfaction of high school principals in Mississippi as measured by the Minnesota Satisfaction Questionnaire (MSQ). The primary question addressed by the study was: What is the overall job satisfaction level of high school principals in Mississippi as measured by the Minnesota Satisfaction Questionnaire? In addition to the primary question, six other questions were addressed by the study. They were: (a) What is the general satisfaction level of high school principals in Mississippi according to the following demographic variables: public or private school, gender, age, ethnicity, level of education, salary level, years of experience as a teacher and administrator, school size and school socio-economic level? (b) Is there a relationship between general job satisfaction and the Mississippi Department of Education rating level (1-5) among principals in public schools? (c) What is the satisfaction level of high school principals in Mississippi for each of the 20 dimensions of the job as measured by the MSQ? (d) Which of the demographic variables of public or private school, gender, age, ethnicity, experience, school size and Mississippi school rating can be predictors of general job satisfaction for high school principals in Mississippi? and (e) What effects has the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) had upon job satisfaction of Mississippi high school principals? All 355 of the high school principals in the state of Mississippi were invited to participate in the research. One hundred fifty three of them responded. This represented 43% of the state's high school principals. Each principal completed the demographic data sheet, the MSQ and responded to questions concerning the No Child Left Behind Act. The Long-Form Minnesota Satisfaction Questionnaire was used to measure job satisfaction. This instrument utilized a 20-dimension Likert-type scale with live response alternatives ranging from "Very Dissatisfied" (weighted 1) to "Very Satisfied" (weighted 5). On this scale, the general satisfaction score for the respondents resulted in a mean of 3.93 (SD=.55) indicating that these principals are "Satisfied" (3.00-3.99) with their jobs. According to the demographic variables, an general satisfaction scores were within or above the "Satisfied" range. The mean scores for the 20 dimensions ranged from "Satisfied" (3.00-3.99) to "Very Satisfied" (4.00-4.99). Compensation ranked the lowest in the (M=3.30, SD=1.02), and Moral Values ranked the highest (M=4.29. SD=.55). In relation to the No Child Left Behind Act, 58% of those surveyed reported that they have less job satisfaction since initiation of NCLB. This could be due to higher stress and increased workloads as 79% report having increased stress levels and 86% report an increased workload. At the same time 70% report being able to spend less time with their families or significant other. Recommendations for further research included longitudinal and interval studies to determine if changes occur over time, studies to include elementary and middle school principals, a study to investigate how a principals job satisfaction level affects job performance of the schools teachers and success of students, a qualitative study including interviews to determine more specifics and insight into principals job satisfaction and possibly bring to light new issues related to job satisfaction. Also, further investigations into the relationship of the No Child Left Behind Act are warranted in relation to budget constraints, high stakes testing, special education, accountability and other areas mentioned in comments principals made during this study.