Attitudes and beliefs regarding classroom management between traditionally certified and alternatively certified high school teachers

Joyce Blomquist Gibbes

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine if there was a difference in the attitudes and beliefs of traditionally certified and alternatively certified high school teachers regarding classroom management. The study investigated the difference between the classroom management perceptions of teachers who were certified through traditional university teacher-training programs and those who were certified through a southeastern state's alternate route certification program. The instrument used in the study was The Attitudes and Beliefs on Classroom Control (ABCC) Inventory (Martin & Shoho, 1999). The study sample consisted of an equal number (57) of traditionally certified high school teachers and alternatively certified high school teachers (57) in six public school districts in the southeastern state. Two of the selected school districts were located in each of the state's three Supreme Court Districts (North, Central, and South). Within the area of classroom management, the study addressed three dimensions or subscales: Instructional Management, People Management, and Behavior Management. As measured by the ABCC Inventory, the Instructional Management dimension considered the tasks teachers engage in while delivering instruction. The second dimension, People Management, as measured by the ABCC Inventory, focused on teachers' beliefs about students as persons and what teachers do to help students develop. The third dimension measured by the ABCC Inventory was Behavior Management. Similar to the concept of discipline, but much broader, it was concerned with the strategies teachers used to prevent misbehavior rather than by simply reacting to it. In all three dimensions there was no statistically significant difference between the attitudes and beliefs of alternatively certified high school teachers and traditionally certified high school teachers. The overall findings of this study indicated that the two groups of teachers in the sample surveyed held similar attitudes toward classroom management.