Title

The Effect of Interdisciplinary Teaming On Student Achievement In Middle Level Schools

Date of Award

2005

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Educational Leadership and School Counseling

First Advisor

Ronald A. Styron, Jr.

Advisor Department

Educational Leadership and School Counseling

Abstract

This study investigated the difference in student performance (academic achievement, attendance, and behavior) between Mississippi middle schools where interdisciplinary teaming is implemented and those in which a more traditional junior high approach is used. The study was conducted in the spring semester of the 2004-2006 school year. Participants included 49 Mississippi middle schools housing only grades 6-8. Data were collected from the Mississippi Department of Education, individual schools, and a nationwide Web site reporting demographic data about schools across the United States. Using version 12.0 of the SPSS software program, four MANCOVAs (multiple analyses of covariance) were used to determine if there was a significant difference between sixth grade academic achievement, seventh grade academic achievement, eighth grade academic achievement, attendance, and behavior in Mississippi schools where the practice of interdisciplinary teaming is implemented and those that use a more traditional junior high approach. Data regarding racial composition and percentage of students receiving free/reduced lunches in each school were also collected so that the covariates of percentage of minority students and socioeconomic status could be held constant. After testing each of the four hypotheses, it was determined that there was no significant difference in sixth grade academic achievement, seventh grade academic achievement, attendance, or behavior between middle schools that implement the practice of interdisciplinary teaming and those that do not. The only significant difference was in the area of eighth grade academic achievement.