Assessment of music educators procedures and beliefs concerning evaluation of grade 3 student music achievement in Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada

Ann Marie Lane

Abstract

Inconsistency in the beliefs about music evaluation and discrepancy in the utilization of music evaluation procedures among and by music educators of grade 3 music students exists. The purpose of the study was to develop a survey questionnaire and to utilize this questionnaire to investigate and assess the beliefs, methods and procedures concerning evaluation of music achievement among grade 3 music educators in Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada. An online electronic questionnaire was used to survey teachers of grade 3 music regarding their music evaluation beliefs, methods, and procedures. Frequencies, percentages, and t -tests were used to analyze the data. Thirteen conclusions about grade 3 music were determined from the research data: (a) music educators considered music an academic subject rather than an activity, (b) music educators structured their music classes, (c) music educators believed school boards held no strong beliefs about the status of music as an academic subject or an activity, (d) music educators believed school boards held no strong beliefs about the degree of structure in music, (e) music educators beliefs and their understanding of school board beliefs regarding the status of music differed significantly, (f) music educators beliefs and their understanding of school board beliefs regarding the degree of structure in music differed significantly, (g) music educators considered participation more important than any other area of music instruction, (h) music educators formally evaluated their students less than once a month or monthly, (i) music educators considered music instruction and teaching objectives most important when selecting their method of evaluation, (j) in most cases music educators decided their own method of evaluation, (k) music educators evaluated participation most frequently, (l) music educators did not evaluate specific areas to the same degree to which they considered them important in their instruction, and (m) observation was the most commonly used method of evaluation among music educators.