Hiding behind the mask of staff development

Gaylynn Ann Asher Parker

Abstract

This study was designed to evaluate whether a significant difference existed between teachers' and administrators' perceptions of effective staff development practices based upon the National Staff Development Council's context, process, and content variables. Subjects consisted of kindergarten through twelfth-grade teachers and administrators in a coastal Mississippi school district. The instrument, "Self-Assessment of Implementation of National Staff Development Council's Standards of Staff Development," was used with permission from the National Staff Development Council. It contained a thirty-six-item Lickert scale that measured the dependent variables and four items that categorized the respondents by status, experiences, and degree level. The responses were analyzed using frequencies, means, and standard deviations. Hypotheses were tested using the general linear model. Results indicated that no significant difference existed between teachers' and administrators' perceptions of effective staff development based upon the National Staff Development Council's context, process, and content variables. Having this clear vision of how district goals about effective staff development paralleled national standards is essential to increased teacher commitment to learning and focusing on student achievement. Data indicated that both teachers and administrators were organized into a true learning community whose professional development goals were aligned with national standards. The contents of this dissertation further explain the results of this study.