Generativity, personal narrative, and individual differences in affective valuations

George Schreiner

Abstract

In this study individual differences in generativity in the context of person's narrative pattern of affective valuations were examined among a sample of 50 participants. It was hypothesized that participants' level of generativity (as measured by the Loyola Generativity Scale and the Generative Behavior Checklist) would be positively associated with positive affect scores, self-enhancement scores, and other directed-affect scores and negatively associated with negative affect scores on the Self-Confrontation Method (SCM). Further, it was hypothesized that participants' level of generativity would be associated with the well-being, the generalization and the idealization index of the SCM. These relationships were predicted for three SCM temporal dimensions--past, present, and future. Contrary to the study's prediction, results suggested that reported levels of generativity were mostly unrelated to either positive or negative affect. Participants who reported higher levels of generative concerns reported higher positive affect scores for the future time dimension only. As hypothesized, participants who reported higher levels of generative concerns reported significantly higher self-enhancement scores. This was true for the past, present, and the future. The findings on the self-enhancement scores are similar to previous research findings. Participants who reported higher levels of generative concerns reported higher other-directed affect scores for the past, but not for the present or future. A significant relationship between generative behavior and scores on the various dimensions of positive, negative, self-enhancement, and other-directed affect was not found. No correlations between levels of generativity and the well-being index, the generalization, or the idealization index were found.