Title

Organizational Identification and Concertive Control

Date of Award

2007

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Communication Studies

First Advisor

John C. Meyer

Advisor Department

Communication Studies

Abstract

Organizational identification and concertive control are two key areas of interest to organizational communication scholars. This dissertation reviewed relevant research on both concepts and addressed the problem of previous research not establishing an empirically sound relationship between the two constructs. To examine their relationship and the effects of salience on both concepts, two hypotheses were proposed. H1 : When individuals' organizations are made more salient, individuals will identify more strongly with their organizations than when their organizations are not made more salient. H2 : A positive and statistically significant relationship exists between individuals' perceptions of organizational identification and concertive control. Hypothesis 1 was not supported indicating that category salience does not affect reported levels of organizational identification. Hypothesis 2 was supported in an initial study and upon replication, signifying that a statistically significant relationship exists between organizational identification and concertive control. The findings indicated that simple category recognition does not affect perceived levels of organizational identification. A more substantial identification-eliciting device, other than salience, must be used to enhance perceived levels of organizational identification. Organizational identification and concertive control were found to be in a reciprocal relationship feeding and intensifying each other. Organizational identification was found to be a requirement for a functioning concertively controlled system.