Title

Factors Which Impact the Conduct of Fifth Grade African-American Males

Date of Award

2006

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Educational Leadership and School Counseling

First Advisor

Ronald A. Styron, Jr.

Advisor Department

Educational Leadership and School Counseling

Abstract

This study examines the factors that impact the conduct of fifth grade African-American male students who participated in the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study Kindergarten (ECLS-K). The participants in this study are located throughout the United States of America. These students attend private and public schools. The data for this study were provided by the National Center of Education Statistics (NCES), a division of the U.S. Department of Education. The researcher utilized ECLS-K's Public Use Data File and Electronic Codebook to create an SPSS syntax file in order to measure the factors that impact the conduct of fifth grade African-American male students, therefore providing recommendations for K-12 administrators in the areas of family structure, motivation, attention level, reading achievement, sweets consumption, reading intervention, and conduct. A partial correlation was conducted that showed that SES, family structure, attention level, and standardized reading scores were strong mediating factors, r (403) = .326, p < .003. The hierarchial multiple regression showed that motivation, sweets purchase with implied consumption, and reading interventions controlling for reading scores, SES, attention, and family structure predicted conduct even more accurately, R2 change = .066, F = (17,475) = 3.511, p = .000. Suggestions for future studies are presented as well.