Title

Academic Performance, Attendance, and Behavioral Issues: Implications of Early Elementary Education

Date of Award

2007

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Educational Leadership and School Counseling

First Advisor

David E. Lee

Advisor Department

Educational Leadership and School Counseling

Abstract

The purpose of this research was to extend the scope of prior research beyond the investigation of the relationship between student-related variables and the event of dropping out of school to include two categories: early elementary education and environment as they are related to the process of dropping out of school. The ultimate goal of this study was to identify factors such as reading and math grades, and adverse environmental conditions in grades 1 through 3 as they relate to the process of students' dropping out of school. The participants in this study included students enrolled in select GED programs in south Mississippi and English I students enrolled in a select south Mississippi community college. The ages of the participants were 18 years of age or older. The students completed a questionnaire constructed by the researcher to measure their environmental conditions in grades 1 through 3. Transcripts were also collected randomly and anonymously. Each transcript was examined for first through third grade reading and math scores. Fifty non-completers and GS completers responded to the questionnaire. Two hundred and forty transcripts were collected from three south Mississippi high schools, 120 completers and 120 non-completers. A t test and logistic regression analysis was used to test for a significant relationship between poor academic performance in grades 1 through 3 and future dropout, and for adverse environmental conditions in grades 1 through 3 and future dropout. A statistically significant relationship was found between poor academic performance in grades 1 through 3 and future dropout and between adverse environmental conditions in grades 1 through 3 and future dropout. The areas of first grade reading and third grade math were more significant than others, as well as the adverse environmental condition of poor parental involvement.