Title

Emotional Intelligence and Academic Success in College

Date of Award

2006

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Educational Leadership and School Counseling

First Advisor

Wanda Maulding

Advisor Department

Educational Leadership and School Counseling

Abstract

During 2003 and 2004, 1205 undergraduate students at a four-year, research intensive university were given the Bar-On EQi: Short. The data from the Bar-On EQi: Short was collected along with demographic data on the students during their first four semesters of college. Correlations were examined between emotional intelligence and gender, ethnicity, ACT score, and grade point average, number of terms completed, and number of hours failed within the first four semesters. The findings of this research suggest that there is indeed a significant relationship between emotional intelligence and academic success in college. This study found that there is a positive correlation between the five emotional intelligence component scores (intrapersonal, interpersonal, mood, stress and adaptability) and the individual semester grade point averages of the first four regular semesters. Further, this study found a positive correlation between emotional intelligence component scores and academic persistence and a positive correlation between emotional intelligence and ACT scores. Lastly, this study found a relationship between emotional intelligence scores and both gender and ethnicity. This study did not find a relationship between the number of hours a student fails during a semester and the same student's emotional intelligence scores. Further, this study did not find a relationship between emotional intelligence and gender and ethnicity combined.