Date of Award

Spring 2-15-2018

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Polymers and High Performance Materials

Committee Chair

Dr. Derek L. Patton

Committee Chair Department

Polymers and High Performance Materials

Committee Member 2

Dr. Robson F. Storey

Committee Member 2 Department

Polymers and High Performance Materials

Committee Member 3

Dr. Sarah E. Morgan

Committee Member 3 Department

Polymers and High Performance Materials

Committee Member 4

Dr. Charles L. McCormick

Committee Member 4 Department

Polymers and High Performance Materials

Committee Member 5

Dr. Yoan C. Simon

Committee Member 5 Department

Polymers and High Performance Materials

Abstract

Polymer particles (micro to nano) with tunable functionality have emerged as a promising and viable technology platform for applications including coatings, cosmetics, nanomedicine, and imaging. Unfortunately, the lengthy polymerization time and lack of intrinsic functionality in the monomers used to fabricate particles is an industrial challenge. Thiol-ene chemistry cirmcumvents these limitations with very rapid polymerization kinetics, high reaction yields, with supressed side reactions and inherent functionality. This dissertation demonstrates the utility of thiol-ene/yne polymerization in miniemulsion and microfluidics to generate functional materials in a one-pot-method. The functionality is typically generated via off-stoichiometry thiol-ene (OSTE) resins which allow for either excess SH or alkene/yne functionality to be present throughout the material. The accessability of these functional groups are proven via infrared spectroscopy, confocal and optical microscopy.

The first chapter focuses on the burgeoning field of thiol-ene/yne chemistry within multiphase emulsions and introduces innovative methods to generate functional particles/materials. Chapter II describes the first thiol-ene miniemulsion process where surfactant concentration, ultrasonication time/amplitude, and OSTE resins are explored. Chapter III expands the miniemulsion process to include thiol-yne resins in addition to the ability to encapsulate hydrophobic materials such as modified silver nanoparticles. Chapter IV highlights the utility of thiol-ene resins within microfluidics to generate unique multiphase particles that can outperform traditional acrylate-based resins. The application of thiol-ene chemistry in emulsions introduces a new class of functional materials which can be easily translated into exicisting technologies.

ORCID ID

0000-0003-3343-2945

Available for download on Monday, March 04, 2019

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