Date of Award

Fall 12-7-2018

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

School

Social Science and Global Studies

Committee Chair

Dr. Robert Pauly

Committee Chair School

Social Science and Global Studies

Committee Member 2

Dr. Kenneth Hansen

Committee Member 3

Dr. Joseph St. Marie

Committee Member 3 School

Social Science and Global Studies

Committee Member 4

Dr. Tom Lansford

Committee Member 4 School

Social Science and Global Studies

Abstract

The purpose of this dissertation is to contribute to the body of knowledge on indigenous governance, specifically that of Native Americans and Alaska Natives. This project examined how differing circumstances of Native Nations influence how Native Nations leaders perceive their ability to govern and their relationships with non-indigenous entities. It sought a greater understanding of the cultural adaptations of Native Nations, and how these adaptations influence governance and relationships with state and federal government entities. To gather information, surveys were sent out to all leaders of Native Nations in the United States, according to the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) listing of tribal leaders. In addition, interviews were conducted in person and by phone. Rather than providing a significant amount of data that can be the basis for sweeping generalizations, this dissertation presents a contribution to the body of knowledge on indigenous governance, focusing an examination of the unique circumstances of Native Nations, and how leaders of Native Nations in the United States have creatively adapted to these circumstances. The research contributes to scholar efforts to incorporate the indigenous worldview in traditional political science and international relations literature.

Available for download on Monday, December 07, 2020

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