Title

Treatment Seeking Among College Students with Comorbid Hazardous Drinking and Elevated Mood/Anxiety Symptoms

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

11-27-2017

Department

Psychology

Abstract

Background: Hazardous drinking is prevalent among college students and often comorbid with mood and/or anxiety disorders; however, these disorders frequently go untreated. Prior studies have found that individuals with comorbid hazardous drinking are more likely to seek treatment than those with an hazardous drinking alone. Objectives: The current study tested possible psychological and structural explanations to understand these treatment seeking behaviors. Methods: A sample of 222 students identified as hazardous drinkers (AUDIT ≥ 8) participated from September 2010 to April 2011. Behavioral measures designed to mimic actual treatment seeking and self-report measures were used to assess treatment seeking behaviors, and the influence of psychopathology and individual predictors on treatment interest. Results: Students were more interested in treatment for emotional problems than for alcohol problems. Further, treatment seeking interest was significantly higher among individuals with comorbid hazardous drinking. When provided a telephone offer for a free on-campus clinic appointment, no students were interested in receiving treatment for alcohol use problems, but some were interested in an appointment for emotional problems (n = 13). Of those students expressing interest on the phone, seven attended the clinic appointment. Logistic regression analyses revealed that students with anxiety, anxiety sensitivity, and depression were more likely to attend the clinic appointment. Conclusions/Importance: In sum, targeting mood and anxiety disorders may be a viable way to increase treatment seeking rates in hazardous drinking college students.

Publication Title

Substance Use & Misuse

Volume

53

Issue

6

First Page

1041

Last Page

1050

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