Title

The Influence of Perceived Job Flexibility and Spousal Support On the Marital Satisfaction of Parents of Children With Special Needs

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

4-24-2019

Department

Child and Family Studies

Abstract

Parents of children with special needs can experience more stress in their marriage than parents of children without special needs. Divorce rates are higher for parents of children with special needs than for the general population, creating a need to study potential influencers of marital quality to promote healthy relationships within these families. Previous work has focused on the child as a major influence for the marital relationship, however this research sought to examine less commonly discussed factors that influence marital satisfaction for these parents. Perceived job flexibility and perceived spousal support in parenting were targeted as potential influencers, as they impact the amount of time and the quality of care an individual can provide. A mediation model was attempted to explain the mediating role of perceived spousal support in parenting in the relationship between perceived job flexibility and marital satisfaction. Results showed no correlation between perceived job flexibility and marital satisfaction. Positive correlations between perceived job flexibility and perceived spousal support in parenting were found and positive correlations were also seen between perceived spousal support in parenting and marital satisfaction. Analysis produced a more linear model of influence than the predicted mediation model. Implications of these findings were discussed.

Publication Title

Community, Work & Family

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