Title

How Do Different Dimensions of Adolescent Narcissism Impact the Relation Between Callous-Unemotional Traits and Self-Reported Aggression

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

1-1-2017

School

Psychology

Abstract

The current study examined the moderating influence that different aspects of narcissism have on the relation between callous‐unemotional (CU) traits and aggression in a sample of 720 adolescents (500 males), ages 16–19 enrolled in a 22‐week residential program. Findings from the two studies revealed that psychopathy‐linked narcissism as assessed by the Antisocial Process Screening Device (APSD; Frick & Hare, 2001; Antisocial process screening device. Toronto: Multi‐Health Systems.) and vulnerable narcissism as assessed using the Pathological Narcissism Inventory (PNI; Pincus et al., 2009; Initial construction and validation of the Pathological Narcissism Inventory. Psychological Assessment, 21, 365–379) significantly moderated the relation between CU traits and aggression in adolescents. Conversely, non‐pathological narcissism assessed by the Narcissistic Personality Inventory for Children (NPIC; Barry, Frick, & Killian, 2003; The relation of narcissism and self‐esteem to conduct problems in children. Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, 32, 139–152) and PNI grandiose narcissism did not significantly impact this relation. These results suggest that forms of narcissism most closely connected to internalizing problems combined with CU traits are associated with relatively heightened aggression in youth. The implications of these findings are discussed. Aggr. Behav. 43:14–25, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Publication Title

Aggressive Behavior

Volume

43

Issue

1

First Page

14

Last Page

25

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