Title

Absenteeism, Educational Plans, and Anxiety Among Children With Incontinence and Their Parents

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

1-1-2015

Department

Curriculum, Instruction, and Special Education

School

Education

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Children with incontinence have more absenteeism, poorer academic performance, and potential social difficulties during the school years. These children and their parents are at risk for illness-related anxiety. Whereas educational plans are designed to remediate educational, medical, and social-emotional barriers at school, little research has explored the relationship among absenteeism, educational plans, and anxiety for this population.

METHODS: Eighty-three families provided demographic information and completed either the Revised Children's Manifest Anxiety Scale Second Edition (RCMAS-2) or the Adult Manifest Anxiety Scale (AMAS-A). A multiple regression analysis was conducted to determine the relationships among these variables.

RESULTS: Children with chronic illness resulting in incontinence had greater than expected rates of absenteeism. A high level of absenteeism was a significant predictor of parental anxiety, but not child anxiety. Over one third reported having no plan in place to support the child's needs at school. However, when a plan was present, it had no impact on child or parental anxiety.

CONCLUSIONS: Absenteeism contributes to familial anxiety and educational difficulties. Despite the potential for educational plans to support these children at school, these plans are underutilized for children with incontinence. This population requires more attention to their academic and social-emotional well-being at school.

Publication Title

Journal of School Health

Volume

85

Issue

4

First Page

241

Last Page

250

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