Title

What Drives Racial Attitudes in Elementary School Children: Skin Tone, Facial Physiognomy, or Both?

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

4-1-2021

School

Psychology

Abstract

This work examines whether racial attitudes—when measured by both explicit and implicit measures— are driven primarily by skin tone, facial physiognomy, or both in 5 to 12-year-old children. Participants evaluated faces varying in skin tone (from dark to light) and facial physiognomy (from Afrocentric to Eurocentric). In an explicit task, children rated how much they liked each face. In an implicit task, participants completed a child-friendly version of the Affect Misattribution Procedure, where they rated a Chinese character as “good” or “bad” following a racial prime. Results suggest that pro-White attitudes (especially those measured by the explicit task) are driven by both factors, vary by perceivers’ race, and are present in both White and non-White children, though skin tone exerts a larger influence than other features, at least in explicit evaluations. Our results also raise the possibility that pro-White biases might be more internalized by non-White children in the American South.

Comments

Stepanova, What Drives Racial Attitudes in Elementary School Children: Skin Tone, Facial Physiognomy, or Both?, 'Psychological Reports' (124, 2) pp. 809-838. Copyright © 2021. DOI: 10.1177/0033294120916867.

Publication Title

Psychological Reports

Volume

124

Issue

2

First Page

809

Last Page

838

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