Title

Examining Fundamentalism and Mental Health In a Religiously Diverse LGBTQ+ Sample

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

6-1-2021

School

Psychology

Abstract

Much literature shows positive relationships between religiosity and mental health. Among sexual and gender minorities, this relationship is more complex—studies show positive and negative relationships between religiosity and mental health. However, there are methodological limitations present. To address these issues, we examined the relationships between the revised religious fundamentalism scale, depression, anxiety, and stress among religious and nonreligious sexual and/or gender minority individuals using curve estimation regression analysis procedures. Using MTurk, 93 individuals who identified as sexual and/or gender minorities passed 85% of attention checks. Their data were used (M Age = 30.43; SD = 7.18). Bisexual (72.0%), male (52.7%), white (47.3%), and Hindu (38.7%) were the most common identifiers. Cronbach’s alpha was excellent for all measures (α = 0.90–0.97). There was a curvilinear relationship between religiosity and anxiety. The curvilinear approach (31.1%) explained a greater proportion of the variance than the linear approach (22.8%). A linear relationship, but not a curvilinear relationship, was found between religiosity and depression. This same trend was found between religiosity and stress. Religiosity influences mental health. To support sexual and gender minorities, providers should proactively examine their biases, prioritize diverse religious and nonreligious samples, supplement linear analyses with curvilinear analyses, promote acceptance within healthcare and within faith communities, and prize clients’ experiences of religion and how those experiences influence their mental health. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved)

Publication Title

Spirituality in Clinical Practice

Volume

8

Issue

2

First Page

149

Last Page

160

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