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Abstract

Learning Management Systems (LMSs) have been widely adopted in higher education worldwide, but predominately used as repositories of learning materials. Mobile access to LMSs enables greater mobility and flexible learning, and thus may help boosting non-repository uses of LMSs, maximizing their educational affordance. This study examined the extent to which mobile access to an LMS, Moodle, was used for various learning activities, with a focus on those beyond storing and retrieving learning materials, as well as the factors influencing students’ non-repository uses of LMS via mobile access. A mixed-method approach was applied, with survey responses collected from 316 students and interviews with 26 students and five instructors across nine courses in a comprehensive university in Hong Kong. The results showed that mobile access to non-repository uses of Moodle was significantly less frequent than that to repository uses across all courses, and students viewed mobile access to the Moodle platform largely as a backup to supplement computer access. Findings suggested four inter-related factors influencing mobile access to LMS for non-repository uses, including course LMS activity design, instructors’ attitudes towards LMS, the nature of tasks conducted with LMS, and situational contexts.

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