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Abstract

Sports venues can increase opportunity for crime and public order disturbances when they are in use, but the impact of sport venues on their local communities have largely been overlooked by sport management research. Theories from criminology provide utility for local public safety officers to plan for event-specific patterns in local criminal activity, but most research of the impact of sport venues on crime has either been theoretical or applied broadly at societal or city levels. Here, we consider routine activity theory and crime pattern theory to better understand the increased frequency of crime events within the local neighborhoods of sports venues on days when these facilities are used. This study presents an inferential analysis of crime reported in the vicinity of two major sport venue districts in Cleveland, Ohio, United States to test theoretical predictions for the impact of sporting events on neighborhood crime patterns. Results confirmed sports events at each venue affected the frequency, type, and time of crime in the vicinity of both districts; crime frequency was greater on game days. Moreover, the greater effect of game days was substantially increased frequency of violent crimes, resisting arrest, and property-related crime reports.

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