Title

The Effects of Sequential Composition Experiences On the Music Aptitude and Composition Creativity of Selected Korean Third-Grade Students In General Music Classes

Date of Award

2003

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Music

First Advisor

Charles A. Elliott

Advisor Department

Music

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of regular composition instruction with the use of a musical notation software program on music aptitude and compositional creativities of selected third-grade students in general music classes in the Republic of Korea. The researcher randomly assigned two general music classes. The experimental group (N = 33) received sequential composition instruction using Finale Notepad 2003 software and tonal and rhythm patterns, and the control group (N = 33) received only traditional music instruction. Both groups received music instruction 40 minutes twice weekly for eight weeks on the regularly scheduled general music classes. The researcher administered Gordon's Primary Measures of Music Audiation (PMMA) to both groups prior to and at the conclusion of the study. The Kratus' composition rating scale was administered to only the experimental group at the conclusions of the third lesson and the final week. Students in the experimental group were asked to compose two songs of the first and final products on the software Finale Notepad 2003 . Using the Kratus' composition rating scale, three individual judges rated each participant's first and final products for six creative composition dimensions. The results of analysis, from the PMMA scores and the compositional products' scores, revealed the following; (a) there were statistically significant differences between the two groups at the .05 level on the posttest scores of the PMMA-Tonal subtest and of the PMMA-Composite. However, there was not a statistically significant difference between the two groups at the .05 level on the posttest scores of the PMMA-Rhythm subtest; (b) there were statistically positive significant differences among the first and final products for the six creative composition dimensions at the .05 level within the experimental group. The final products had improved on all six dimensions more than did the first products; (c) there were positively significant correlations among the six creative composition dimensions and music aptitude scores at the .05 level within the experimental group; (d) within the experimental group, statistically positive significant intercorrelations were found for all six creative composition dimensions at the .05 level.