Title

Relationships Among Teacher Change Readiness, School Culture, and Student Achievement

Date of Award

1999

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Educational Leadership and School Counseling

First Advisor

Jack Klotz

Advisor Department

Educational Leadership and School Counseling

Abstract

Literature in the area of organizational management over the past decade has repeatedly emphasized the importance of a positive culture and continuous improvement to organizational health and survival. The results of this study will help to assess the degree to which these theoretical claims can be transposed and applied to education. While culture and change orientation are directly transferrable concepts, schools tend to define their success by student achievement; education's chief measure of product or service quality and profitability. The potential impact of school culture on student achievement may very well depend on the priority placed on the latter within the context of the school mission and values as well as the manner in which the requisite cultural messages are overtly and covertly relayed to students. Therefore, it is logical to examine and compare the cultural environments as well as the change readiness of staff in comparable schools with marked differences in student achievement. The general purpose of the study was to determine if there was a relationship between student achievement as measured by Provincial English Language Arts standardized examination results and (a) school culture and (b) teacher change readiness. There was a statistically significant difference ( p < .05) found in culture as perceived by teachers between schools with higher levels of student achievement and schools with lower levels of student achievement. Schools with higher levels of student achievement possessed a more positive culture as perceived by teachers than schools with lower levels of student achievement. There was no statistically significant difference ( p < .05) found in culture as perceived by students between schools with higher levels of student achievement when compared to schools with lower levels of student achievement. There was no statistically significant difference (p < .05) found in the change readiness of teachers in schools with higher levels of student achievement when compared to teachers in schools with lower levels of student achievement.